(BGF) – Shubhrangshu Choudhury, the former BBC journalist honoured by Foreign Policy magazine as one of 100 Leading Global Thinkers “for giving rural Indians a megaphone”.

Shubhrangshu Choudhury left his job as a BBC producer in 2010 to launch a unique mobile news service called “CGNet Swara” which provides a  platform that enables people in remote areas of India can now receive and share news. His CGNet Swara, which has now expanded from Chhattisgarh to the Central Gondwana adivasi areas of Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra.

In an interview with IANS, he said “it’s good that these voices are heard in those platforms,” Choudhury said calling for the coming together of the rural or poorer India and urban India divided into three new castes – “internet, mobile and radio” – to complement each other’s strengths.

“If we use communication technology a bit creatively” by connecting internet, mobile and radio to “hear these voices and solve these little problems” Choudhury added, “there will be less wars, less problems”.

Choudhury also shared more about his plan of deploying services in Adivasi areas where concentrate “the poorest of the poor people” and the dream of creating a democratic model of communication in India with the India Tomorrow.

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Indian journalist wins global award, wants media to bridge rural, urban divide

November 18, 2014 | By Arun Kumar

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Shubhranshu Choudhary (Photo Credit: India Tomorrow)

An Indian journalist honoured by Foreign Policy magazine as one of 100 Leading Global Thinkers “for giving rural Indians a megaphone” would like the 21st century to become the century of democratisation of media.

Shubhrangshu Choudhury, who left his job as a BBC producer in 2010 to launch a unique mobile news service called “CGNet Swara” in Maoist insurgency-hit Chhattisgarh was honoured here Monday as one of the Chroniclers or “the masters of storytelling”.

“These international honours are always good to give attention to the remotest parts of India,” he told IANS in an interview as “there is more of India between Delhi and Bangalore and beyond Gurgaon”.

“So it’s good that these voices are heard in those platforms,” Choudhury said calling for the coming together of the rural or poorer India and urban India divided into three new castes – “internet, mobile and radio” – to complement each other’s strengths.

“If we can come together, we can make a better world, a better future, a better tomorrow,” he said suggesting big problems in central India – called as India’s biggest threat by former prime minister Manmohan Singh – were nothing but an accumulation of small problems.

“If we use communication technology a bit creatively” by connecting internet, mobile and radio to “hear these voices and solve these little problems” Choudhury said, “there will be less wars, less problems”.

His CGNet Swara, which has now expanded from Chhattisgarh to the Central Gondwana adivasi areas of Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra, was a platform to connect rural and urban India, he said.

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